HMRI - DFK Crosbie and Circle of Strength

HMRI imageSince the very beginning, back in 1998, the Hunter Medical Research Institute has been devoted to improving the immediate and future wellbeing of families.
 
Growing from less than 100 researchers to more than 1600 today, HMRI is now one of the largest medical research institutes in NSW. HMRI researchers are working across more than 60 health and disease areas, and collaborations are being conducted all across the world. Their research is already making global impacts in asthma and airway diseases, cancer, stroke, mental health, heart disease and much more.
 
Since the very beginning, back in 1998, the Hunter Medical Research Institute has been devoted to improving the immediate and future wellbeing of families.
 
Growing from less than 100 researchers, students and staff to more than 1600 today, HMRI is now one of the largest medical research institutes in NSW. Hunter researchers are working across more than 60 health and disease areas, and collaborations are being conducted all across the world. Their research is already making global impacts in asthma and airway diseases, cancer, stroke, mental health, heart disease and much more.
 
HMRI logoHMRI’s exceptional growth – into a local, national and increasingly international leader in health research – owes a lot to the support of the community and organisations that believe in their important work. 
 
DFK Crosbie and its employees have been supporting HMRI since the institute began, through payroll giving and direct donations, and more recently through the Circle of Strength. The Circle of Strength is a powerful and passionate group of supporters who raise vital research funds that drive innovation and release HMRI’s full research potential. 
 
HMRI Director, Professor Michael Nilsson explains that its support is not limited to a specific disease area or research project, because the medical research story is much broader.
 
“Delivering patient-focused outcomes requires supporting start-up studies and ideas, fostering a flow of information and innovation back and forth between scientists, doctors and people in the community,” Professor Nilsson said.
 
“In research, game-changing ideas and innovations often emerge suddenly. Sometimes we risk losing the best young researchers due to a funding gap between grants, and sometimes we need to underpin the ‘nuts-and-bolts’ work that keeps the labs and research groups running at full speed.”
 
“DFK Crosbie and our Circle of Strength members plays a very important role in supporting this vital aspect of medical research.” 
 
The ability to innovate and be responsive also attracts collaboration and investment from institutes and industry around the world. 
 
For example, HMRI was chosen as the first test site outside of Sweden to test and refine a revolutionary timesaving diagnostic device called the Stroke FinderThe helmet allows doctors to image the brain very early to check if patient has had a stroke, so the best treatment can begin as early as possible. 
 
This game-changing device is compact and portable, enabling rapid deployment in Emergency Departments and ambulances. HMRI and its partners were a natural choice for inventor Medfield Diagnostics because of our region’s expertise in innovation, stroke care and research.
 
Of course, when someone close to you is affected by an illness it’s a natural reaction to directly support research in that particular area. But the medical research story is about much, much more than funding specific projects and equipment.